The Freedom Trail Part #1 – Travel, Boston Common and Massachusetts State House – Boston, MA

*Author’s Note: The idea of writing about the entire Freedom Trail in one post sounded appealing in the sense that it was all be together.  However, the sheer length of said post, along with photos, would be way too much for me to expect anyone to read.  Hence, I’ll be breaking it up into several easier-to-digest posts.

A few days before flying into Providence, RI, H- sent me a text, asking me to bring comfortable shoes so we would be able to walk the entire Freedom Trail in Boston, MA.  For anyone who doesn’t know, the Freedom Trail is a 2.5 mile stretch that includes 16 stops important to U.S. history and the formation of the county, from Boston Common to the U.S.S. Constitution.  Although it is a literal trail (a red brick path guides you along your way), there are also many alternative options for those who can’t/don’t want to walk, like trolley tours, and the Boston Duck Tour (very cool – I would love to go on one some day!).  Also, don’t let the length fool you – The Freedom Trail itself is only 2.5 miles, but with all the stops along the way, it can easily take most of the day.

The literal red brick Freedom Trail
The literal red brick Freedom Trail

My brother got his undergrad degree in western Massachusetts, and while he, my future sister-in-law, and my parents have all been to Boston, I’ve never had the opportunity to go.  H- and B- have only been once or twice themselves, though never at the same time, so the Freedom Trail seemed like the best way for us to tour and explore the “must-see” sites of Boston together.

So at some ungodly, pre-sunrise hour in the morning, all three of us woke up, drove to the Quincy Adams station and took the “T” metro into Boston.  Even though it was August and we arrived in Boston around 8am-ish, it was very chilly.  Both H- and I ended up wearing sweaters until around lunchtime.  Sadly when we arrived, the Visitor’s Center was closed, but we had several guide books with us, plus we knew there would be several different gift shop along the way in case we wanted souvenirs 🙂

Freedom Trail Visitor's Center
Freedom Trail Visitor’s Center

From the Visitor’s Center, the trail begins by cutting through Boston Common, the oldest park in the U.S., and stopping in front of the Massachusetts State House on Beacon Hill.

A fountain in Boston Common, with the Park Street Church in the background
A fountain in Boston Common, with the Park Street Church in the background
Boston Common
Boston Common
Massachusetts State House
Massachusetts State House
Monument to the 54th Regiment of the Massachusetts State Infantry (Civil War) located outside the State House
Monument to the 54th Regiment of the Massachusetts State Infantry (Civil War) located outside the State House
The opposite side of the monument
The opposite side of the monument

For Part #2, click here

3 thoughts on “The Freedom Trail Part #1 – Travel, Boston Common and Massachusetts State House – Boston, MA

  1. I LOVE Boston. My mom works there during the week and you will have to go back to do the Duck Tours. I did them once and while it was not a great day to do them (right before Hurricane Sandy hit the East Coast), I would love to redo them because they are a lot of fun. They used them in the World Series victory parade last fall when the Red Sox won.

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